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her. mr. alter's comments are directly on point because there is that authority under the constitution. >> right. >> but i don't think anyone who has followed this would say there was anything close to 51 senators who opposed her playing a foreign policy role in this administration. what i counted, and i have done some reporting on this issue, was about six senators who said they were considering filibustering her, maybe several more who didn't like some of her positions and wanted to get into the details 6 some of her statements about libya. but we have to be very clear when when he look at these kind of standoffs and we look at the way washington works that we in the press and many in the political class fall into the habit of talking about what a small minority does as if it's the majority. i don't mean to go on too long -- >> but you are so pause a minute, ari. >> i think it's an important -- >> of course it is. >> it's not a question of 51 votes. it never has been in the united states senate long before all of these filibuster issues and things. if you lose a certain set -- number
for the freis to adopt her. the trouble is, no one ever told the girl's father. court papers show the birth mother knowingly gave the adoption agency the wrong contact information for mr. achane. two addresses in texas, even though she knew he was in south carolina. tyra bland told "good morning america" her husband wasn't there for her and that's why she turned to the freis and adoption. >> they cared, you know, about me and, you know, the well-being of lia when he wasn't there. when he wasn't around. when he didn't care. he showed no interest in me being pregnant. when he left me, he didn't leave my with an address. >> reporter: but achane's lawyer told me that's just not true. that his client provided for bland by paying the bills and that he wanted to care for their baby. >> they took a child away from a married father. >> reporter: achane has since divorced his wife. but around the time talia was supposed to be born, achane contacted his wife's sister and brother-in-law in an effort to track down his wife and baby. court records show achane's brother-in-law told him he had seen his wif
, a utah judge has now ordered the couple return the toddler to her biological father within 60 days. the judge found that mr. achan's opportunity to develop a relationship with his daughter was deliberately thwarted. the court ruled that because the fryes knew mr. achan had been married to talia's mother and was her legal father, he was entitled to immediate custody of his daughter. not what talia's birth mother was hoping to hear. >> my heart was comfortable with lia being with the fryes. i would rather see her with me struggling first before she goes with him. >> reporter: the clock is ticking for the fryes to hand talia over. the deadline is january 16th. but the fryes aren't giving up. they have requested a stay of the judge's order and are planning to appeal. calls to the fryes were not returned but their lawyer sent me an e-mail explaining the fryes do not believe that anything can be gained by trying their case in the court of public appeal. they believe the district court made some fundamental errors in its decision and they will raise those with the appropriate appellate co
government. >> mr. chairman, encourager requesting your concerns. >> a day to ask her second pin with a great way to the witness panel beginning with steve haydee who was hurt and served for three consecutive mandates as the armed groups experts on the drc. investigate and co-authored reports submitted and presented to the u.n. security council sanctions committee during the groups expire 2012 mandate he was also coordinator of the six member team working under security council resolution 2021. prior to joining the group of experts, mr. hege worked with organizations. really here with john prendergast, cofounder of the enough project, initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. these are the quick administration and the state department congress. he's worked with unicef, human rights, international crisis group and episode five and help launch the sentinel project pictures clingy. mr. prendergast to search for peace in africa for well over a quarter century. then we would hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at hanford university server is petitioned the professor,
is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threat. earlier this month, north korea carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the
viewers, bya because you asked now. they write this out of kentucky, when is mrs. clinton expected to testify about her role in the benghazi attacks on our consulate. a second question, were there any witnesses that survived the attack and when will we hear their testimony. secretary clinton you mentioned her, will that happen or not? >> she has said she will testify but only after the internal report investigation is done. i think she should testify immediately. but we have not heard her testimony yet and i think that's got to be a priority. when it comes to those witnesses, there were witnesses there. they were interviewed by the fbi. those interview reports have obviously not been made public, first of all, but also my last understanding is that the intelligence committee was still waiting to receive some of those reports. bill: why would they not share that with you? its that a risk. >> i think if they could be shared with me in a classified setting, i review information in the classified setting all the time and obviously have to protect that information. but most importantly
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
for her opening. >> thank you, mr. chair and thank you for your leadership on this issue in holding this important hearing. while this committee held a hearing on the drc not too long ago, recent event in eastern congo motivated closer examination of this current crisis. i want to especially thank assistant secretary ambassador carson and other witnesses are offering testimony to today's hearing. i would like to commend many of you sitting in the audience for your tireless work towards peace and justice for those affected by the past and current crisis. the concerns have been heard and the committee will elevate the status of drc supersedes the international attention needed to bring about lasting peace and stability. myself, members of the committee and colleagues in the senate are deeply concerned with omicron reports of human rights violations, recruitment of child soldiers and the involvement of drc's been eastern region. which is just scraping for the international community to work on common interest towards the resolution of a crisis that goes well beyond and 23 spirit we mus
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
she'll dance around the subject. another says i think mrs. clinton looks worn down. that's it for america's new headquarters in washington. good-bye to our intern cally stewart, it's her last day. congrats and good luck. we'll miss you, happy hanukkah to those who have begun celebrating the festival of lights. >> chris: i'm chris wallace, two big issues today. the fiscal cliff talk stuck in neutral and concerns syria will use chemical weapons against it's own people. with 23 days and more posturing, will the white house cut a deal. we'll talk two senators on the front lines of the debate. democrat charles schumer and republican bob corker. then the u.s. draws a red line telling syrian president assad not to use chemical weapons in that country's civil war. we'll discuss the latest intelligence and fallout with michael oren. a fox news sunday exclusive. plus the supreme court agrees to take up same-sex marriage. we'll ask our sunday panel if the court is likely do decide whether gays have a constitutional right to marry and a final farewell to my best friend winston, all r
of grandpa. mr. bush's daughter, jenna bush hager, announcing she is pregnant with her first child. the former president says he is quote, fired up about becoming a grandfather. how about that? former first lady laura bush is thrilled with the news. it will be the cowell's first grandchild. she and her husband were married the at texas ranch. you might remember photos from the beautiful wedding. congratulations to all of them. jon? jon: let's hope that goes well. that will be great. construction projects, jenna are usually a hopeful sign of a rebounding economy. but if far too many areas these projects are grinding to a halt. in hard hit new york city half finished residential or commercial buildings are all too common sight. senior correspondent eric shawn is live in brooklyn with a look why. >> reporter: hi, jon. they are empty monuments to a bad economy. unfished buildings like this one you can see just stopped in mid-construction. officials say this is problem throughout new york city. likely from the economic crisis from 2008. they say it is issue of bank financing that instit
house. >> yes. mrs. bush, very elegant, very beautiful decorations. she copied her mother in law's signature look, the snowy trees in the grand lobby throughout the white house. when we were working on it, they'd say more snow, less snow, more snow. the first lady had a vision, and she really communicated it to us, and we finally got it right. it was perfect. >> very quickly want to talk about bo, the first family's dog. >> he's a real celebrity at the white house. this year we have bo-flakes. if you go through, you should find the ornaments that have bo's paw prints on them. there are bo sculptures and bo cookies. he is a big, big part of the white house at christmas. >> colleen christian burke, the book is called "christmas with the first ladies, the white house decorating tradition from jacqueline kennedy to michelle obama." what a great idea. i wish you the best of luck with this book and merry christmas. >> merry christmas. >> thanks so much. >>> ahead on "starting point," eight days left to make a deal. does president the obama want to go off the cliff? why some say that's
should let the susan rice issue quiet down and let her withdraw. >> there are aides in the white house a little frustrated saying hey, mr. president, you got to make a decision. the fact of the matter he hasn't made a decision between susan rice or john kerry. the argument being made, they're sort of hanging in the wind. john kerry has been very -- he has really kept a low profile. susan rice chose the opposite, a decision to say i have to save my skin here. maybe prove or disprove whether i'm worth the political risk and let me try to cool things down myself. they both took on two different tracks. if the president had decided i think we would have it. there is a feeling in the white house you can't let this lingering. the other problem, they don't want seven confirmation hearings at the same time. they would kind of like to space these out a bit. >> john kerry going in and out, back doors to avoid the press and not taking questions on this today. chris cizilla, we'll see you later. thank you so much. >> the business community is closely tracking all of this. the progress or lack of p
's the little girl. last spring, it looked like emma was going to lose her battle against leukemia, and doctors used, get this, a strain of hiv to save her life. dr. sanjay gupta joins me ahead to explain. well, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> hey, ton
tv. mr. rather, thank you for being here. >> i'm always honored to be here. >> susan rice withdrawing her name from consideration for secretary of state. this is not the most unforeseen thing in the world but it still leaves a lot of questions unanswered. what do you think is the most important thing that just happened or that we should watch for happening? >> the most important thing that just happened is that president obama has once again been backed down and away. let's make no mistake. this is chalk one up for the republicans. they can hopefully in private smile, even smirk, wink at one another. they have the professional scalp of susan rice now hanging on their door. they backed president obama down and away. president obama for whatever reasons, and i thought andrea mitchell, a lot of the potential reasons for, it chose not to fight it to the end. there will be any number of people, and not all of them democrats, who say this tells us something about president obama. he was not for a friend, a close friend, a long-time supporter, someone who was eminently qualified, rhodes scho
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
became, i think, more excited about this legend, mr. brubeck, and she came into the room. she was very, very calm, and we gave her a poster. >> yes. >> but, man, when she went home, she just lit up all of the south of france with the stories about meeting dave brubeck. >> mr. cosby, you spent some time with him. what was he like really as a person? >> in the 1950s the music was supposed to be the music of the cool, the cool guys, you know? psychology and smool smooth. that's what he was. he brought it with it and others who know music technically like marselles. hopefully you can get him on to explain to you those -- i mean, dave was really a different kind of player. rhythmically as he was thinking with the cords. he was cool. that's whaefs. cool. >> he broke racial barriers. you talked about that a little bit. what was behind that? what was behind his thinking that he felt. >> as i have said, racism is a waste of time, and people who try to push, it keep it out front because of whae their idiocy happens to be, there are people like dave and others, et cetera, et cetera, louie armstro
,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important it is overseas to have somebody who knows the president personally, who could call the president if they needed to. and here's the really important thing, who cares first and foremost about the president's policy. not about what the bureaucracy at the state department wants, but about the president's policy. i'm not saying anna wintour's going to do all that -- megyn: right. >> but that is important. megyn: what does that person do? if you become the boord to the u.k., what do you do? >> well, that is one of the hardest
to talk her out of it. >> and it's irrelevant relevant who came up with the idea first because the idea was out there. ultimately, it's up to the president. if she calls him up and says mr. president, this is too difficult for me. it's too hard. i can't do this. i would like to withdraw my name, he can very easily say, you know this is your -- i am the president, i am going to stand by you 100% and, boom. >> that's the president telling you that. she could maybe still have the fortitude to say no but most people presented with that are going to say, mr. president, om okay. i am in. you are right. that did not happen. >> how did this -- what do we know because again, at the briefing yesterday boehner had had the news kong friends in the morning where he once again said, we are ready to deal but the white house is not ready to deal. they won't come up with any specifics, which i think is just bs. that's what he said yesterday morning. he announces. jay carney says there it is. nothing happening on that front. suddenly boehner shows up at the whitehouse. h
of italy and says mr. monti should stay out of politics. kelly? >> carolin roth from milamilan. that wasn't her voice, that was the audio. >> i don't know about him staying out of politics. don't see that happening. >> clearly not. >>> still to come, we'll talk to the global ceo of sanrio. the owner of the iconic character hello kitty about the outlook for holiday spending. ♪ any tree on this lot is on me. i'm the messenger, by the way. what's your name? joanne. with the hundreds that i save with progressive on my car insurance, this tree is on me. no way. way. this tree is on me. really?! yes. aah! let me just trim it up a little bit for you. [ buzzing ] thank you. saving's greetings. you guys are gonna get this tree right here? are you sure that's the one? i'll tie it to the roof for you. make savings a new holiday tradition. ♪ look this isn't my first christmas. these deals all seem great at the time... but later... [ shirt ] merry christmas, everybody! not so much. ho ho ho! this isn't that kind of deal. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at
together the president now says he means it and we say you are right to munich, mr. president. we sure do have your back. his searing tv sketchiness news conference, as the title shipped to her military force to be used to prevent those chemical weapons from ever seeing the light of day and never ever of congress i know of will be behind the president. but what do you do with the weapons themselves? >> that's the lesson of libya. if we did not have sufficient control of the arms caches all over the place and obviously those weapons have gone to places that we didn't want them to do. the second major issue is the increasing ambrogi hobbyist, al qaeda on the ground fighting very well, by the way, that issue is going to be a very serious challenge. the longer this goes on, the bigger challenges. [inaudible] >> secretary of state if i understand correctly is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the american state department meeting with our allies. one of the things that reference for recognition of the new searing national council is something we'd be doing t
. at 9 p.m. eastern "after words" with cynthia lowen. she talks about her book, "bully," an action plan to combat the bullying crisis. and we conclude tonight's prime time coverage with john meacham. in his biography of thomas jefferson, mr. meacham reports despite mr. jefferson's strong beliefs, he was able to successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. that all happens tonight on c-span2's booktv. >> and now patrick tyler talks about the influence that israeli military leaders have had in shaping israeli government policy since the country's founding. this is about an hour, 20 minutes. [background sounds] >> good afternoon. welcome to the new america foundation, i'm peter bergen. it's really my pleasure to introduce patrick tyler, a man who doesn't need introduction. he's author of multiple books on china, the middle east and most recently the excellent new book, "fortress israel," which is a really excellent account of the last several decades of the kind of israeli national security establishment and, obviously, of considerable interest right now given
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
news. a mr. president duchess of cambridge resting now at kensington palace after being treated at the hospital. we're going to see her exit in just a moment. she was being treated for a severe form of morning sickness. we know you've heard a lot about that, but we wanted to talk about the road ahead as well as a few other health stories with an attending physician at winthrop university hospital, also british, so we thought that would make it even more appropriate, doctor. so what's ahead for kate now? >> well, she's very much going to be in the eyes of the media all over the world, so i'm sure that she'll be glad when this period of morning sickness passes. i mean, obviously, morning sickness is extremely common, but she's had an extremely severe form that required intravel now fluids and, hopefully, as her pregnancy progresses, the morning sickness will improve. jenna: anything as a doctor you'd be concerned about now? >> well, obviously, we worry about dehydration, but usually the baby's absolutely fine, so if the fluids are replaced, hopefully as that passes, all will be we
that work with him. senator lugar. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i join you in welcoming back secretary burns and tom nides. both are good friends to have committee, and we send our very best wishes to secretary clinton as she recovers from her mishap. secretary's pace of activities has been during the last several years extraordinary by any measure. we're grateful for her devoted service to our country and for the courtesy she has shown to our committee throughout her tenure. our or hearing today gives us a chance to review events at our consulate in benghazi that resulted in the deaths of ambassador christopher stevens, foreign service officer sean smith, u.s. embassy security personnel glenn doherty and tyrone woods. many questions have been raised about this tragedy about this whether we had sufficient intelligence ahead of time and. ambassador stephens became a good friend to this committee. while he was detailed to my staff in 2006 and 2007. his advice to me on the complexities of events in the region was invaluable. after he went back to state, he continued to brief staff from time to
of their end-user customers. idu thank you for your testament and look forward to hearing from her witnesses to i yield back. >> the gentlelady yield back. the gentlelady from california. the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman but i like to take a few seconds. thank you, mr. chairman and direct working with but i like to take a few seconds to try to offset some of the criticism of you in which this hearing opened. of all the vast causes in the whether the difficult is that brought down the economy in 2008, no area i think is more complex than the areas that you've been charged to oversee, derivatives. not enemy, not for me, not activities of countrywide. this is one of the more catastrophic areas as will look back on when they were, and also probably the most complex area. and i salute you and couple that you are really working hard iran summit that is a normalcy challenging in the face of criticism but i exit the chairman of the committee when i say this. it is -- a sequence of the also forgets the devastation that was visited on this countr
.n. ambassador john bolton. he is also a fox news contributor. mr. ambassador, i'm guessing you read the letter to the, the op-ed piece in "the washington post" this morning which susan rice talks about why she decided to submit her wii drawl letter from consideration. she writes this as it became clear my potential nomination would spark enduring partisan battle i concluded it would be wrong to allow this debate to continue distracting from urgent national priorities. were there any enduring partisan battles when you were serving in that same job? >> well, probably so but you know, what's unusual about this circumstance obviously is she had not been nominated yet and to have the little exchange that we had yesterday, she writes to the president. the president issues a statement, results in the obama administration preemptively surrendering on a war that hadn't been declared yet. you know when jim baker was chief of staff for ronald reagan, he operated on a principle that the president never loses. that you try and structure things so that the president doesn't take any unnecessary hits because
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)